NFL needs more minority owners, but franchise values make that difficult

The NFL has seen the ranks of ownership expand from a tradition of rich, aging, white men in recent years. But as more females become involved in ownership and control of NFL teams, from Martha Firestone Ford of the Lions to Dee Haslam of the Browns to Amy Adams Strunk of the Titans to Kim Pegula of the Bills to Gayle Benson of the Saints (Virginia McCaskey is listed as the Secretary of the Bears; her son, George is the Chairman), the league still doesn’t have a principal owner who is African-American.

If the value of an NFL team now stands at $2.275 billion (as paid by Panthers owner David Tepper) and if the value of a team will skyrocket in an environment of legalized gambling (as predicted by Mavericks owner Mark Cuban), Warren would need to have at least $682.5 million in liquid cash to get in the door, and that’s just to cover the 30-percent ownership minimum.

This doesn’t mean Warren couldn’t be part of an ownership group, with a much smaller piece of equity and a much larger voice. However, fewer and fewer people, regardless of race, will be able to afford NFL teams in the coming years. And with not many African-American billionaires (as of March 2018, Forbes listed only Robert Smith, Oprah Winfrey, and Michael Jordan in that category), it could be a long time until the NFL has the African-American controlling owner that many think it needs.

Peterson also recently said he would be open to a return to New Orleans.

Peterson has posted his workout videos, hoping teams take notice. In truth, Peterson likely would have interest in any team that shows interest in him.

Ezekiel Elliott, Dak Prescott among those hoping to fill team’s leadership void

The Cowboys will miss Jason Witten, Orlando Scandrick and Dez Bryant. Witten and Scandrick served as two of the team’s captains last season, and Bryant provided energy and enthusiasm.

So who replaces Witten, Scandrick and Bryant as team leaders?